PH third monkeypox case 'fully recovered,' close contacts asymptomatic

ABS-CBN News

Posted at Sep 16 2022 01:28 PM

Colorized transmission electron micrograph of monkeypox virus particles (orange) cultivated and purified from cell culture. Image captured at the NIAID Integrated Research Facility (IRF) in Fort Detrick, Maryland. Credit: NIAID
Colorized transmission electron micrograph of monkeypox virus particles (orange) cultivated and purified from cell culture. Image captured at the NIAID Integrated Research Facility (IRF) in Fort Detrick, Maryland. Credit: NIAID

MANILA — The country’s third monkeypox case has "fully recovered" from the disease, the Department of Health announced Friday.

According to DOH officer-in-charge Maria Rosario Vergeire, the 29-year-old Filipino has completed the isolation period at home. A clearance certificate was issued to the patient on Sept. 8.

Of the patient's 17 close contacts, 13 have finished their self-monitoring period and 4 have finished quarantine. All are asymptomatic. 

Meanwhile, the country's fourth monkeypox case has been discharged from hospital on Sept. 15.

But the 25-year-old Filipino is continuing isolation at home until all the patient's scabs fall off, Vergeire said.

No additional rashes or symptoms have been observed from the patient.

Of the patient's 20 close contacts, 18 have finished quarantine and 1 has completed the self-monitoring period without developing any signs and symptoms of the disease.

A relative who assisted the patient at the hospital only started the quarantine period on Sept. 15.

The Philippines has so far detected 4 cases of monkeypox, with the first 3 cases linked to travel. The first and second monkeypox cases have already recovered and were discharged from isolation.

LOCAL TRANSMISSION?

Vergeire said the agency couldn't say yet if there's local transmission of the disease in the country.

"I cannot be certain to say that there is no local transmission," she said. "Bakit? Alam natin hindi natin nate-test lahat. Alam natin hindi lahat ng may sintomas kung saka-sakali ay nakakapag-test o pumupunta sa kanilang mga doktor para magpakonsulta."

"But what is certain right now, handa tayo to detect, handa tayo na gamutin, handa tayo to prevent the transmission of this disease," she added.

(Why? We know that we do not test everyone. We know that not all those who have symptoms get tested or go to their doctor for consultation. But what is certain right now is we are ready to detect, treat, and prevent the transmission of this disease.)

Around 50,000 cases have been recorded in 125 countries in the global outbreak, 98 percent of them in Europe and in North America, according to the World Health Organization.

The disease causes painful and scarring lesions, principally to the face, anus and genitals.

It usually heals within 2 to 3 weeks, but in rare case can lead to severe complications. 

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— With a report from Agence France-Presse