COVID more transmissible than monkeypox: expert

ABS-CBN News

Posted at May 23 2022 12:52 PM

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Video courtesy of PTV

MANILA - COVID-19 is more transmissible than the monkeypox as it can be spread in various ways, an infectious disease expert said Monday.

The Philippines has yet to detect the monkeypox. The disease has recently emerged in 12 countries, according to the World Health Organization.

"It’s still the COVID that's more transmissible because of several ways of transmission. Aside from the droplet, you can also have the airborne... There's also contact transmission," he said.

"For monkeypox the most common human-to-human mode of transmission is only respiratory droplets so within 3 feet of talking to each other without any face mask."

There is a possibility that the monkeypox can enter the Philippines, Solante said.

"Even in countries where the healthcare facilities the ability to diagnose is very high-tech, the infection was still documented," he said.

The DOH has advised the public that practicing minimum health standards can also protect against monkeypox.

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT MONKEYPOX

(Photo from WHO)
(Photo from WHO)

According to WHO, monkeypox is caused by the monkeypox virus, which is transmitted with lesions, body fluids, respiratory droplets and contaminated materials such as bedding. 

The virus has an Incubation period of around 6-13 days but this could also range from 5-21 days.

Symptoms include unexplained acute rash and one or more of the ff: 

  • Headache
  • Acute onset of fever (>38.5oC)
  • Lymphadenopathy (swollen lymph nodes)
  • Myalgia (muscle and body aches)
  • Back pain
  • Asthenia (profound weakness)

Cases where monkeypox has been recorded, as of May 21, are in
Australia, Belgium, Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Netherlands, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, United Kingdom, USA.

WHO said vaccination against smallpox may help stop the virus spread. The illness is self-limiting but may be severe in some individuals, such as children, pregnant women or persons with immune suppression.