Post-EDSA revolt 'dark days' for PH? Analyst says Marcos 'entitled' to his opinion

Job Manahan, ABS-CBN News

Posted at Jan 20 2023 05:58 PM

The Marcos family poses for pictures on stage after the inauguration ceremony of President Ferdinand “Bongbong” Marcos Jr. at the National Museum in Manila on June 30, 2022. George Calvelo, ABS-CBN News/file
The Marcos family poses for pictures on stage after the inauguration ceremony of President Ferdinand “Bongbong” Marcos Jr. at the National Museum in Manila on June 30, 2022. George Calvelo, ABS-CBN News/file

MANILA — President Ferdinand Marcos, Jr. has the right to express his opinion on the events that took place about his family and the country after his father was ousted from Malacañang in 1986, a political analyst said Friday. 

Froilan Calilung of the University of Santo Tomas' political science department admitted that the Marcoses' exile was a "dark episode" for the family. 

"I believe he is actually entitled naman to his personal take on the matter particularly 'yung years from 1986 to 1992... Naaalala natin 1989 was the year when his father, Ferdinand Marcos, Sr. actually passed away," Calilung said during a public briefing. 

"Sa Pilipinas, for us to also see the same thing, masasabi natin na 'yung mga panahon after the oust of President Marcos [Sr.] hindi naman naging smooth-sailing," he added. 

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While the country was able to restore democracy in 1986, Calilung said the succeeding years "was actually marred by a lot of political turmoil."

"If he (Marcos Jr.) would like to think of it as dark days hindi lamang doon sa pamilya diyan kundi dahil sa nangyari sa bansa after [Marcos Sr.]," he said. 

"This is not of course conditioned by his father's [ouster] alone, but shaped by the events that transpired the country during that time, I think yun ang gusto niyang puntusan."

During his one-on-one with World Economic Forum (WEF) president Børge Brende on Wednesday (Davos time), Marcos, Jr described their exile as something "dark" for his family and the country.

The President added that going into politics was something he had to take upon himself for the "survival" of his family. 

The ouster of his father, however, stemmed from the latter's over 2-decade rule in the Philippines marked by human rights abuse, plunder of government wealth, and clampdown on press freedom.

People Power icon and then-President Corazon Aquino established a revolutionary government, appointing a 50-member commission to create a new constitution. 

Her leadership though was marred by at least six failed military coups, political squabbling, insurgent attacks, and her failure to change a political system dominated by elite family clans.

Marcos Jr.'s sister, Senator Imee Marcos, last year produced a controversial film "Maid in Malacañang." 

It aims to portray their family's interpretation of their last 72 hours in Malacañang Palace in February 1986, before they were flown out from Manila to Hawaii amid the People Power revolution. 

The film was accused of historical distortion, particularly in its depiction of the late President Aquino and nuns who provided sanctuary for her. 

— with reports from Agence France-Presse