Education workers to get hazard pay in ECQ, MECQ areas: DepEd

Jaehwa Bernardo, ABS-CBN News

Posted at Aug 17 2020 03:33 PM

Teachers and school employees prepare elementary school modules for blended learning for the coming school opening at the Geronimo Santiago Elementary School in Manila on July 21, 2020. Jonathan Cellona, ABS-CBN News

MANILA — Public school teachers in areas placed under enhanced community quarantine (ECQ) and modified ECQ can get a daily hazard pay amounting to P500, the Department of Education said Monday.

DepEd teachers and personnel are entitled to such amount when they report to work, in line with Administrative Order No. 26 that grants hazard pay to government personnel, said Education Undersecretary Annalyn Sevilla.

"Ang ating mga empleyado under MECQ or ECQ, kapag kayo ay pinapasok, eligible sa hazard pay," Sevilla said in a press briefing.

The hazard pay is one of the monetary support that the department is offering its personnel as the country continues to grapple with the threat of COVID-19, which has already sickened over 161,000 in the country.

Sevilla said teachers are also set to receive P500 in September for their annual medical examination, and a P1,000-incentive in October for World Teachers' Day.

The monetary support that teachers and other education personnel may receive or avail. Photo from the Department of Education

The DepEd is also coordinating with the Employees' Compensation Commission, Government Service Insurance System, and Philippine Health Insurance Corporation for benefits that teachers may avail in case they get sick with COVID-19, she said.

Education Secretary Leonor Briones stressed that teachers would not be forced to go out of their homes to work, especially in areas where there are many cases of COVID-19.

"In places like NCR (National Capital Region) or Region 4, places where there is lockdown, teachers should not be going out because they will be prevented from going out," she said.

Briones made the statement as some teachers expressed worries that they could get the respiratory disease while delivering learning materials to students at home.

In-person classes remain prohibited pending the availability of a vaccine against COVID-19. In the coming school year, lessons are set to be delivered through modules, online classes, television, and radio.