DOH: 8 people had 'minor adverse events' after Sputnik V jabs

ABS-CBN News

Posted at May 08 2021 06:31 PM

DOH: 8 people had 'minor adverse events' after Sputnik V jabs 1
A health worker shows the vial of the Sputnik V COVID-19 vaccine during its rollout at the Ayala Malls Manila Bay in Parañaque City on May 4, 2021. George Calvelo, ABS-CBN News

MANILA - Eight people experienced "minor adverse events" after being inoculated with Russia's Sputnik V, according to the health department.

However, Health Undersecretary Maria Rosario Vergeire pointed out that these non-serious effects following vaccination were managed.

"Among those given with Sputnik V vaccine for these past days, mayroon po tayong 8 reported na adverse events, and lahat po ito non-serious or minor," Vergeire said in a public briefing. 

Among the side effects experienced by the vaccinated persons were body aches, injection site pain, rash, back pain, headaches, dizziness, and increased blood pressure. 

"All of these were managed and lahat sila ay nakauwi rin pagkatapos," she said. 

(They were able to go home afterwards)

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In March, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) had reported that close to 3 percent of those who received Sinovac and AstraZeneca vaccine jabs had also experienced side effects following inoculation. These were all within the expected range, the FDA reassured the public.

FDA Director General Eric Domingo said the FDA receives reports of suspected side effects daily.

Minor side effects must be reported within a week, while the serious ones must be relayed to them or the AEFI committee within 24 hours, he said.

This week, the government began rolling out the initial "trial batch" of 15,000 COVID-19 shots from Russia's Gamaleya Institute to 5 cities in Metro Manila. 

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The second dose of the Sputnik V vaccine is administered 21 days after the first. 

Authorities expect to finish distributing second doses of the current batch by the third or fourth week of May. 

Among the hardest hit by the pandemic in Asia, the Philippines aims to inoculate a third of its population or 50 to 70 million by the end of the year to achieve herd immunity.