Backstory of runaway ostriches revealed—after one of them dies and becomes adobo 2
The other ostrich has been turned over to the Wildlife Rescue Center of the DENR Biodiversity Management Bureau and is recovering well.
Culture

Backstory of runaway ostriches revealed—after one of them dies and becomes adobo

It looks like we haven’t seen the last of these birds.
RHIA GRANA | Aug 11 2020

One of the ostriches that gave the online world a fleeting respite from the stresses of the pandemic when it was found doing a freedom run in Mapayapa Village, Quezon City, ended up becoming lunch. Adobo to be exact. 

This was confirmed by Atty. Charlie Pascual, legal counsel of Jonathan Cruz, owner of the runaway ostriches.

The ostrich had allegedly died of stress Saturday, following its eventful escape last week—which trended big time on social media.

People online who care about animal welfare were naturally upset by the big bird’s untimely demise.

Sandali lang natin nakita ang ostrich pero minahal na natin. Tapos inadobo lang ng tagapag-alaga nya,” reads one post on Twitter, who wished the ostrich had seen better days.

Journalist Dax Lucas puts it succinctly: “Moral of the story: Give everything you have to any undertaking. If you make a run for it, run for your life. It may be the last chance you’ll ever get.”

The owner had apparently left the case of the dead fowl in the hands of its caretakers, who took it upon themselves to make adobo of the ostrich meat. 

An investigation done by the Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR) reveals that the birds were bought by Cruz from the Philippine Ostrich and Crocodile Farm, Inc. in Misamis Oriental on Oct. 28, 2019.

Pascual said Cruz bought the birds so he can put up an ostrich farm in San Leonardo, Nueva Ecija. Unfortunately, the local transport permit expired on the day Cruz bought the birds, so he had to bring the birds to Mapayapa Village, Quezon City. 

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Based on Cruz’ affidavit, a certain Edwin Jara, a consultant for the farm, allegedly sold the birds (male and female) for P30,000. (The caretakers had apparently helped themselves to a pretty expensive dish!)

Ostrich farming, as well as the eating of ostrich meat, are currently allowed under existing regulations and laws. But DENR Undersecretary Benny Antiporda argues that an ostrich is not a domesticated animal and is still covered by Republic Act No. 9147 or the Wildlife Resources Conservation and Protection Act of 2001.

Antiporda said further hearings on the issue have been scheduled. 

The other ostrich was voluntarily turned over to the Wildlife Rescue Center of the DENR Biodiversity Management Bureau, and as photos spotted online show, it seems to be recovering well.