Why postpone? Here’s why it’s okay to have a wedding even if we’re in a pandemic 2
A pandemic wedding is more intimate, says Jason Magbanua, veteran wedding photographer.
Culture

Why postpone? Here’s why it’s okay to have a wedding even if we’re in a pandemic

“Trust me,” says this veteran wedding photographer, “the faces of the people I film these days are as happy as the faces I filmed pre-pandemic.”
JASON MAGBANUA | Jun 27 2021

It’s been more than a year since my beloved wedding industry came to a screeching halt because of the global health crisis.

I was not the most cheerful person those months but hey, things are looking up and I’m feeling optimistic today. That’s why I’m writing now and not tomorrow—I woke up hopeful today. The timeline is filling up with colleagues humble-bragging about their work schedules and the vaccinations are rolling out. For the first time in a long time, I really think we might pull out of this. Humankind is defeating the veerus!  Yeah, boy. Let’s not mess up our second chances, okay, brothers and sisters?

Why postpone? Here’s why it’s okay to have a wedding even if we’re in a pandemic 3
"Consider just having a ceremony and just figure out a big party in the future," says the author. Photo by Jason Magbanua. 

In the past year, I’ve learned how to adapt and pivot to other pursuits—hello travel vlogging!—but my one true love is weddings. I’ve learned to adapt and really, it ain’t THAT bad. We’ve filmed quite a few over the months so the TLDR version of this post is: It’s ok to plan for your wedding and get married.

Like any happy marriage, weddings come with compromises. You get some, you give some. Forget about the 400 guest count and relish the presence of who’s there. Tuscany out the window? Consider Cebu or Aman. There is always a silver lining. Trust me, the faces of the people I film these days are as happy as the faces I filmed pre-pandemic.

Why postpone? Here’s why it’s okay to have a wedding even if we’re in a pandemic 4
"It’s always about the people, the accoutrements always take a back seat," says the author. Photo by Jason Magbanua. 

The past few months have taught me a thing or two about weddings in the time of Covid. Let me share them to you: 

1.  Intimate weddings are the bomb and they’re right up my alley. I’ve always maintained that it’s always about the people, the accoutrements always take a back seat. Intimacy is not just a number, it’s an invisible web around all the people in attendance vibing to the same frequency.  These are the people who wouldn’t want to be anywhere else but your wedding—not because they were asked to, but because they want to.

2.  Destination weddings are ‘It.’ It’s likely the result of being locked up in our respective homes for a year. There is definite joy in being able to breathe freely in a garden or at a beach. It’s exhilarating.

Why postpone? Here’s why it’s okay to have a wedding even if we’re in a pandemic 5
A smaller wedding somehow makes sure everyone in the crowd wanted to witness your union. Photo by Jason Magbanua

3.  Weddings can be rescheduled but you can’t celebrate a tenth anniversary on the 11th year.  It’s curious that I was able to film a handful of anniversary celebrations in a span of a few months. We had one recently where the attendees were just immediate family that numbered to a total of five persons. It was amazing. Read up more about that HERE.

4.  Now that you’ve saved on that five course meal and million-peso styling, you can splurge on other things. Umm, like video perhaps?

5.  Streaming your wedding for people who can’t come is an excellent idea. I’m going to be honest with you: I came up with the idea to increase the bottomline. But I saw how invaluable it was for people who cannot physically be there at the wedding. With streaming, they are there in spirit as well as through technology.

Why postpone? Here’s why it’s okay to have a wedding even if we’re in a pandemic 6
The photographer at work. Image courtesy of Jason Magbanua

6. Practical Tip: Jazz up those face masks. Nothing like a blue Heng-de face mask to take the glamor and drama away from the image of a crying bridesmaid. Double up if you must.

7. Consider just having a ceremony and just figure out a big party in the future. This one actually took me by surprise. Filipinos love their dinner parties and I didn’t think this would catch on but here we are. More and more couples are having just the preps and the ceremony filmed. And we’re fine with that. It’s a win-win. Couples don’t have to stress over what new rules the IATF will lay down regarding wedding receptions and we get to go home in time for a very early dinner.

Why postpone? Here’s why it’s okay to have a wedding even if we’re in a pandemic 7
After a year of being at home, there's something exhilarating about celebrating on a beach or a farm. Photo by Jason Magbanua

8. There’s fun to be had in a small celebration. Look at it this way—you’re not forced to shake hands with 300 people, half of which you have no idea why they’re there. Plus, only a select few can see you dance your awkward Silk Sonic dance.

9. I would be remiss if I didn’t remind you to NOT let your guard down. A wedding does not provide a magical field of protection over those who attend. Lay down proper protocols for guests and suppliers. We would be happy to oblige.

10.  It’s the best time to focus on what counts. Eyes on the prize, my dahlins.  It’s about the marriage not the wedding, says the wedding videographer who peddles romance for a living. Truthfully, everything else is gravy. If you feel you’re ready to start this new chapter in life, go jump. 

After all, tomorrow is never promised. Today is the only thing we have.

[Email the author for his services at  hello@jasonmagbanua.com or message him thru SMS/Whatsapp/Viber at this number +639178432535.]