Break these unhealthy habits when stuck indoors

Downy

Posted at Oct 06 2020 01:52 PM

Forming new customs and forgetting old practices is all-too-familiar territory for everyone during this quarantine period. As people carry on with modifying their routines and adapting to the varying degrees of community quarantine, it is common that some habits that are disadvantageous to the well-being have been formed.

Deviating from a structure

Flexibility is a good thing and it is an appealing trait to have. However, being too pliant and open-ended without aligning actions to a principle, a mission, or even a short-term objective, is not at all favorable. Whenever possible, stick to a daily routine that will help you achieve both short-term goals and long-term aspirations. Sticking to a system with clearly laid out plans will help boost productivity and keep you on track of your dreams.

Stress eating and having no fitness routine

Uncertain situations tend to bring out the restless side of most individuals. And this can result in coping mechanisms that do more bad than good, such as putting off exercising and panic eating. While these undeniably provide the comfort needed at the moment, bear in mind that it is only a temporary fix and it will most definitely take a heavy toll on one's growth in the long run.

Working extra hours

Others have expressed that the work-from-home setup has made them feel guilty for not working even on weekends and holidays. Why? Because with retrenchments happening in most industries, it can be pressuring to ''slack off'' when others are out there aggressively seeking for a job. In this case, do remember that taking some time off and recuperating is not the same as slacking off. In this period where topics of loss, pain, and anxiety have never been more tender, there is no better time to take breaks to breathe and just survive.

Settling for the bare minimum

Hearing ''just take what you can get'' has become a usual statement these days, with the mindset that lowering the bar for contentment is more than enough, considering the challenges that continue to plague the world. Yet, what fulfillment does this bring other than a mere sigh of relief? Indeed, know when to count small victories, but when there are additional steps that lead to better results, why not take those extra steps?

When it comes to keeping the family safe, every last bit of accessible preventive measure should be subject to the strictest examination. Explore and study options that help overcome challenges in the aspect of food, security, and hygiene. For instance, Downy—a laundry brand in the Philippines—recognizes the importance of laundry germ-protection especially this rainy season that brings about residues of dirt, mold, and mildew; potentially soiling clothes and building up bacteria that causes bad odor.

Downy Antibac Fabric Conditioner helps enhance the laundry experience by functioning to keep clothes fresh after every wash, and helps eliminate the ''amoy-kulob.'' What makes it even better is that there is a variant that can help with different laundry needs and lifestyle. Furthermore, Downy Antibac is from the same makers of Safeguard and that ensures 99.9% germ protection (tested on representative germ S. aureus on cotton fabric) on clothes even after washing. 

Many troublesome things are happening in the world today. It looks as if restlessness and worries come with the ''new normal.'' What makes things better is knowing you have people you can trust. Find someone to depend on, someone whose advice you can be confident in. By building a solid support system, you can find companionship in the worst days, and help in breaking bad habits you may have accumulated.

There are no deadlines in figuring out the tempo of life right now but breaking these unhealthy habits should at least prevent you from being left behind.

To learn more, follow Downy Philippines on Facebook at facebook.com/DownyPhilippines .

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