OPINION: UN rapporteurs

Teddy Locsin Jr.

Posted at Sep 24 2016 03:30 AM

UN rapporteurs have been invited by Duterte to come over—but not to insult our government or the views and feelings of most of our people about the drug problem and the solution adopted to solve it or expunge it.

UN rapporteurs work for us and not for themselves or for their personal countries. They work for us as a nation united with other nations on terms of equality. It is in the UN Charter: one country one vote—our vote the same as that of the United States outside the Security Council.

The rapporteurs are invited here to ascertain the precise facts, and determine the real count, of the killings taking place of alleged drug pushers who are—and this the UN rapporteurs must swallow—destroying our race by addicting them, like the British addicted a third of the Chinese, in order to enslave them. 

The UN rapporteurs cannot be here to condemn us—before a court in which we sit as equal judges. 

They will be here to uncover and to present to us the true extent of the drug problem, and the propriety of the solution we adopted in the face of the problem—as that problem has been accurately assessed by us and by them. 

They are here to discover for how much of that solution is our government responsible, and how much of it are drug lords and dirty cops just cleaning up after themselves. But they cannot tell us not to attack drug lords and the drug problem so that we will not be forced to kill them. 

They cannot tell us to do next to nothing about a problem, just so that we shall not be forced to adopt an extreme solution. That is out of the question. 

They can tell us if our solution is too much or too little, insufficient or inappropriate, to successfully eliminate the drug problem. 

It is not and never shall be the job of UN rapporteurs to tell us, their bosses, that drugs are not a problem, and that killing its pushers is wrong in every case. 

President Obama has regularly used drone strikes to solve another bad people problem: the problem of terrorist resistance to the demands of the United States. There is no other way.

UN rapporteurs cannot criticize the drone warfare of the United States unless they can propose another practicable way to destroy the threat that drone attacks eliminate. 

The job of a UN ambassador, so far as I can see—and I have yet to consult the experts like Philip Mabilangan who have had a deeper look—is to make the UN work; work for all the peoples whose nations are united in it. And that includes us, ourselves. 

And while we answer to the United Nations, it is only to the extent that we answer to the commitment we made when we joined the United Nations to achieve its benign purposes. But never, ever, to insult ourselves.