Life-size galleon replica to soon rise in Pasay City

ABS-CBN News

Posted at Aug 09 2017 02:03 PM

A look inside The Galeon: Manila-Acapulco Galleon Museum. Jonathan Cellona, ABS-CBN News

A look inside The Galeon: Manila-Acapulco Galleon Museum. Jonathan Cellona, ABS-CBN News

A look inside The Galeon: Manila-Acapulco Galleon Museum. Jonathan Cellona, ABS-CBN News

A look inside The Galeon: Manila-Acapulco Galleon Museum. Jonathan Cellona, ABS-CBN News

A look inside The Galeon: Manila-Acapulco Galleon Museum. Jonathan Cellona, ABS-CBN News

A look inside The Galeon: Manila-Acapulco Galleon Museum. Jonathan Cellona, ABS-CBN News

A look inside The Galeon: Manila-Acapulco Galleon Museum. Jonathan Cellona, ABS-CBN News

A look inside The Galeon: Manila-Acapulco Galleon Museum. Jonathan Cellona, ABS-CBN News

A look inside The Galeon: Manila-Acapulco Galleon Museum. Jonathan Cellona, ABS-CBN News

MANILA – Expect a life-size replica of the Nuestra Señora del Pilar de Zaragoza, a galleon built at the Cavite shipyard during the 18th century, to soon rise in Pasay City. 

The galleon will be constructed over 17 months starting this August and will be the centerpiece of The Galeon: Manila-Acapulco Galleon Museum at the Mall of Asia Complex. 

The museum is a collaborative initiative by Museo del Galeon Inc. chairman Edgardo Angara and former ambassador of Mexico to the Philippines Tomas Calvillo Unna, with support from the private sector led by SM Prime Holdings led by Hans Sy.

Foreign dignitaries were invited to an exclusive viewing early this week, on the eve of the closing ceremony of the ASEAN 50th anniversary celebration.

“It’s quite appropriate that we are launching this, we are introducing this galleon on the occasion of the 50th anniversary of the ASEAN. Because of the 10 ASEAN countries, eight of them were shippers in this galleon. And of the seven dialogue partners, five of them were big, big shippers, including China, Japan, the USA, India, and Cambodia. So this, as the ASEAN slogan says, is really a partnership for change,” Angara told guests and members of the media during the event.

“This galleon is a teaching museum. We want to teach children that our ancestors did something worthwhile not simply for themselves but for the material and cultural enrichment of the planet,” he added. 

Secretary of Foreign Affairs Alan Peter Cayetano, for his part, said: “The history of the galleon trade is not a history of one people or one country. It is a shared history.” 

Spanning a total of 8,000 square meters of exhibition space, the museum will showcase the 250-year history of the galleon trade and the exchange of goods, culture, and ideas between the Asia-Pacific and Americas, and beyond to Europe and Africa.

There will also be local and international exhibitions of loaned artifacts from various museums across the globe, as well as the Center for Pacific Trade and Cultural Studies, which will support research initiatives on the galleon trade.