6 arrests so far at 2012 London Olympics

Agence France-Presse

Posted at Aug 04 2012 01:55 AM | Updated as of Aug 04 2012 10:47 AM

LONDON - British police said Friday they have made six arrests so far at the London Olympics venues for suspected offences, including racial insults and verbally abusing an Australian competitor's family.

Three spectators were thrown out of the Velodrome Thursday after a stream of abuse was allegedly directed at the family of Australia's Kaarle McCulloch, who won the women's track cycling team sprint bronze with teammate Anna Meares.

One of the trio, a 33-year-old man, was arrested under public order laws and fined.

Lithuanian national Petras Lescinskas, 36, was charged with racial abuse at his country's basketball game against Nigeria on Tuesday.

He pleaded guilty and was fined £2,500 ($3,885, 3,180 euros) after the court was told he had made a Nazi salute gesture, while the group he was with made monkey chants.

But Lithuanian fans and media on Friday slammed British officials, insisting the behaviour had been completely misinterpreted.

Meanwhile a 20-year-old man, an employee within the Olympic Park, was arrested on suspicion of theft late Thursday and was taken into custody at an east London police station.

Florian Flesche, 25, from Le Revest-les-Eaux in southern France, was arrested on Sunday at the shooting at the Royal Artillery Barracks. He has been charged with common assault and is due to appear in a London court later this month.

A 45-year-old man accepted a police caution for actual bodily harm after being arrested at Earls Court exhibition centre, the volleyball venue, on Sunday.

A 50-year-old man who was arrested Tuesday at Lord's cricket ground, the archery venue, accepted a police caution for theft.

The 2012 Games, centred on the Olympic Park in Stratford, east London, are surrounded by Britain's biggest peacetime security operation.

A security force of more than 40,000 military and civilian personnel, backed by a huge intelligence operation, is being deployed to protect venues, athletes and millions of visitors.