ABS-CBN News

British-Pinoy painter holds first exhibit in London

Posted at | Updated as of 04/02/14 7:45 PM

British-Filipino artist Maria Farrar, 26, discusses her works with visitors during her first ever exhibit, which opened at the Philippine Embassy in London on April 1.

LONDON - A 26-year-old painter who was born in the Philippines opened her first art exhibit on Tuesday, showcasing works she describes as both uncertain and clear.

Maria Farrar, born in Cabanatuan City and raised in Japan and the United Kingdom, featured 10 pieces in her exhibit at the Philippine Embassy.

Farrar's works explore 17th century Northern European paintings from a modern and multicultural perspective. One of the paintings, for instance, is based on "The Martyrdom of Saint Catherine" by Lucas Cranach, a Renaissance painter from Germany.

"I take a section of the painting and focus on it, and everything becomes uncertain but at the same time everything becomes clear," Farrar told ABS-CBN News. "I like that paradox."

People who went to her exhibit were all praises for her work.

"I like the choice of colors," said Susana Succaram, a family friend of the Farrars.

Helen Potts, another family friend, found Farrar's collection fascinating.

"So much is not said. There's always a mystery about them. There are question marks. You're only getting a part of the painting," she said. "You got to stand and look at it and just imagine. It's up to the viewer almost to interpret the painting for themselves."

"It holds your attention. It makes you actually stop and look," Potts added.

Farrar recently graduated with a BFA Fine Art degree from the Ruskin School of Fine Art and Magdalen College at the University of Oxford. She has also completed an art diploma course at Lincoln College and was trained at Heatherley School of Art.

In September, she will pursue a Master of Fine Art in Painting at the Slade School of Fine Art on a scholarship.

"I have always been interested in European art," she said. "European art has a glow to me that is quite exotic in a way that maybe Western people feel about Japanese and Filipino art."

Farrar said she enjoys the artistic freedom she has in Britain, but that she would also love to hold an exhibit in the Philippines and Japan someday.

Farrar studied for many years in Japan and spent her holidays in the Philippines.

"I would really love to go back to the provinces where my mother grew up, where we stayed and make works about the provinces, the sweet life there," she said.

Ambassador Enrique Manalo said the embassy actively supports Filipino artists in Britain.

"We try and encourage them to display their works and we offer them a venue where they can show their works, whether they’re visual artists and other kinds as long as they can be accommodated given our limited space," he said.

Farrar's exhibit will run until April 11.

LONDON - A 26-year-old painter who was born in the Philippines opened her first art exhibit on Tuesday, showcasing works she describes as both uncertain and clear.

Maria Farrar, born in Cabanatuan City and raised in Japan and the United Kingdom, featured 10 pieces in her exhibit at the Philippine Embassy.

Farrar's works explore 17th century Northern European paintings from a modern and multicultural perspective. One of the paintings, for instance, is based on "The Martyrdom of Saint Catherine" by Lucas Cranach, a Renaissance painter from Germany.

"I take a section of the painting and focus on it, and everything becomes uncertain but at the same time everything becomes clear," Farrar told ABS-CBN News. "I like that paradox."

People who went to her exhibit were all praises for her work.

"I like the choice of colors," said Susana Succaram, a family friend of the Farrars.

Helen Potts, another family friend, found Farrar's collection fascinating.

"So much is not said. There's always a mystery about them. There are question marks. You're only getting a part of the painting," she said. "You got to stand and look at it and just imagine. It's up to the viewer almost to interpret the painting for themselves."

"It holds your attention. It makes you actually stop and look," Potts added.

Farrar recently graduated with a BFA Fine Art degree from the Ruskin School of Fine Art and Magdalen College at the University of Oxford. She has also completed an art diploma course at Lincoln College and was trained at Heatherley School of Art.

In September, she will pursue a Master of Fine Art in Painting at the Slade School of Fine Art on a scholarship.

"I have always been interested in European art," she said. "European art has a glow to me that is quite exotic in a way that maybe Western people feel about Japanese and Filipino art."

Farrar said she enjoys the artistic freedom she has in Britain, but that she would also love to hold an exhibit in the Philippines and Japan someday.

Farrar studied for many years in Japan and spent her holidays in the Philippines.

"I would really love to go back to the provinces where my mother grew up, where we stayed and make works about the provinces, the sweet life there," she said.

Ambassador Enrique Manalo said the embassy actively supports Filipino artists in Britain.

"We try and encourage them to display their works and we offer them a venue where they can show their works, whether they’re visual artists and other kinds as long as they can be accommodated given our limited space," he said.

Farrar's exhibit will run until April 11.