Olympics

By Michael Laxamana, Conrad Angeles, readers

Posted at Aug 28 2008 11:05 AM | Updated as of Aug 29 2008 01:53 AM

 Olympics

I agree with Mr. Sison’s assessment. Sports start at an early age. Elementary Schools should already have track and field, baseball, basketball, swimming, etc… That way by the time they hit high school we can start selecting star athletes that we can train for the Olympics.

Michael Laxamana
mlaxaman[at]visa.com


Where did RP team go wrong in the Beijing Olympics?

Good question and first let's recall the past Olympics since 1924. Based on the records the Philippine team had a medal haul of 7 bronze, 2 silver and 0 gold.
 
That got sports officials to thinking where did the RP team go wrong? Why can’t RP bring home a gold medal.
 
They said this was despite the fact that the PSC or POC spent P50 million in the recent 29th Olympic games. What was unclear to me is how they spent that amount this year? They said through exposure. Is it through media or competition? This I do not know.
 
Ok whatever it was, here I will cite an example of how our athletes can bag a medal in the Olympics. Let's say in the women’s 100m dash. We will win medal in 100m dash if our runner will clock  11.0 -11.2 seconds (gold - bronze). If her run is more than that,  there will be no medal anymore.
 
So that’s the target or objective or parameter in selecting a runner in 100m or 200m dash. The chosen athlete in that event will come from intramurals or PRISSA or Palarong Pambansa games of certain schools. Once we will select the best runners,  start  training these runners in 100m dash, 200m dash and so on.
 
We will record their times. Example in first trial runner A clocked 15 seconds in 100m dash and in the second trial after a week or month she broke that time by running 100m dash in 13 seconds. Then this runners has a potential to win medals because his or her time is improving. If not then this runner must be disregarded et cetera.
 
Another example say Miss Toni Rivero (taekwondo at 67 kgs) and Miss Hidilyn Diaz (Weightlifter at 57 kgs) If Miss Rivero stands 5'6" for instance, she must be trained to kick as high as 5'4" - 5'6". Because this is the approximate height of the “armor” worn by her opponent during the fight. Hitting the body below the underarm and face hard of your opponent is a sure point for a taekwondo fighter. Miss Rivero must kick at that height consistently before she goes to London in 2012. Without hitting that part of the body or “armor” her opponent is wearing she can't earn point. This was the reason why Miss  Rivero lost to Miss Saric of Croatia in the 29th Beijing Olympic held in Beijing China last week.
 
For Miss Diaz, she must train how to lift a barbell heavier than 192 kilograms gradually in order to win a medal in Olympics. In short what they need from the government is proper or rigid training aside form full financial support.
 
Look these athletes have parents and brothers that are looking to him for help. How can they extend help financially if she or he is in government pool as an athlete and going somewhere for practice at their own expense. In this situation he or she is distracted.   
 
That's why I said these athletes need money so they can concentrate on their everyday training. How can they concentrate in practice if money is bothering them? These athletes are not robots,  they're are also living things. They also need rich food so their bodies can  accumulate enough energy and stamina for the Olympic games. If your body lacks good food how can you compete well in international games if your body has less energy, stamina and techniques.
 
Again and in short the government must honestly invest in our prospective athletes for them to perform well.  
 
So to Chairman William Ramirez of PSC. There were two things why RP performed poorly in Olympic games. First I guess poor selection of an athlete in events and second limited financial support and lack of rigid training to our athletes.
 
Change this attitude and I am sure we can win the elusive gold in Olympic competition by 2012.
 
Conrad Angeles
conrad.angeles[at]yahoo.com